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Core Values

  1. Family Centered
  2. Consumer Involvement
  3. Builds on Natural and Community Supports
  4. Strengths-Based
  5. Unconditional Care
  6. Collaboration Across Systems
  7. Team Approach Across Agencies
  8. Ensuring Safety
  9. Gender/Cultural/Age Responsive Treatment
  10. Self-Sufficiency
  11. Education and Work Focus
  12. Belief in Growth, Learning and Recovery
  13. Outcome-Oriented


  1. Family Centered

    ARC was created as family-focused with the provision of onsite childcare and child/family therapy services as well as AODA intervention services directly to the children. Based on CSAT Best Practices AODA treatment is provided within the family context, especially the mother/child bond and other self-defined significant relationships and emphasizes the development of natural support networks of neighbors, church, and family as defined by the women. This focus was strengthened with the results of the initial CHPPE Evaluation which showed that the chief predictor of sobriety and long-term recovery for women was resolution of the mother’s relationship with her children and the fostering of healthy family functioning and family intactness. In fact, ARC counts both the mothers and children as our clients. The Self-In-Relation Model which underpins ARC’s treatment philosophy and practices, also emphasizes the development of natural support networks of neighbors, church, and family as defined by the women. All efforts to include natural support systems will be made to enhance the treatment experience. The “family” is defined by the participant and includes anyone the participant would like to have to become a part of their team.
  2. Consumer Involvement

    ARC’s empowerment model is based on the premise that women know their treatment needs and that AODA treatment must be responsive/adapted to their needs. Participants are involved in the process of curriculum and service evaluation on an ongoing fashion, through formal and informal feedback. The treatment plans are the product of the participant and are developed from an interview that gains information about her strengths and goals. This plan includes quarterly focus groups; consumer surveys; consumer interviews; consumer representation on advisory committees and consumer feedback as program evaluation component with staff participation and commitment.
  3. Builds on Natural and Community Supports

    ARC programs are community-based so that the use of community and informal supports is integral to each woman’s personalized treatment plan. Utilization of strengths-based case management model builds on this by maximizing use of resources through advocacy and interagency service agreements, and fostering the development of new supports/services, building of informal networks of family, neighbors, and church, as identified by a woman; and recognizing that a broader array of services are crucial for encouraging women to enter, stay in treatment. Case managements focus is on the ultimate goal of “weaning” the client from formal support system and building “the fabric of an Informal support system” for each woman. It is one reason for a day treatment (group) model so the women can build peer supports for sobriety with each other since they have often been “abandoned” by other informal family supports by the time of treatment.
  4. Strengths-Based

    Women-responsive treatment has traditionally been focused on building on a woman’s strengths in treatment and promoting a treatment approach which is non-judgmental, non-threatening and positive that builds on her strengths (empowerment) and, as a result, ARC has always approached treatment informally on a strengths-based basis. A strengths/needs assessment is conducted on every participant, staffing forms identify client strengths during the course of their treatment and all treatment and wraparound plans identify on build on the woman’s strengths. All groups are founded on strengths based philosophy of care. Special attention to language and materials have been revised to reflect a strengths based perspective.
  5. Unconditional Care

    Although the values of unconditional care are those of ARC Community Services as an agency, these values have been more formally addressed both in policy and procedure as well as training for ARC.

    Life stressors are always taken into consideration and are considered to be a part of the treatment issues rather than something that the woman needs to manage on her own and then return once she has it together. Our services align themselves with the woman to address these issues. Each participant receives an individualized plan. Amended schedules are completed for participants facing barriers and particularly difficult situations in order to allow them to continue treatment in a way that meets their needs.
  6. Collaboration Across Systems

    The ARC model stresses collaboration with related informal supports, service providers and systems, especially Probation & Parole, Dept. of Public Health, Economic Assistance and Workforce Development on an ongoing basis through case plan coordination, cross-training, interagency agreements and a variety of consultation and advisory committee meetings. The ARC system collaboration is enhanced by centering it around the best interests of the woman and her family with multi-system involvement guided by a woman’s identification of need/resources required for her recovery/employment by the women/consumer herself. ARC calls for an integrated and comprehensive model of collaboration on a system level and on a participant level. ARC reflects a move away from the piecemeal provision of specific services addressing a specific need to building a whole system of services reflecting a common understanding of women and families within a social and environmental context. It represents an attempt at the more complex task of restructuring existing services by creating a wholly integrated system of comprehensive services based upon a shared philosophy and agreed upon goals.
  7. Team Approach Across Agencies

    ARC provides family-centered, women-specific programming especially through the mother/child bond. The team approach process will continue to meet the requirements of a “family team” which consists of a group of people, in addition to the family, who represent a blend of formal and especially informal resources that make up the family support network. This process has been incorporated in the treatment/case plan and wraparound plan.
  8. Ensuring Safety

    The safety of the women participants, children, staff and community are paramount in all levels of ARC’s policies, procedures, programming, treatment and care plan development. While a safety plan is developed for each woman and her family, the participant’s plan also reflects their individual accountability and responsibility to other participants, their families, other systems they are involved with and the community in general. Wraparound plans are completed with system professionals including: Probation and Parole, Bail Monitors, Drug Courts, Jails and Child Protective Services. The goals include such things as restitution, compliance with probation and parole stipulations, meeting stipulations for the safety and return of their children and law abiding behaviors. These stipulations are put in place to promote community and public safety.

    These systems collaborate with ARC staff, the participant and the various formal and informal supports which ensure the safety of others in the community. Participant progress and activities are closely monitored and discussed with the women regularly. Communication between the systems happens frequently to ensure compliance with all stipulations set forth. ARC programming also incorporates various groups designed to reduce abuse, neglect and criminal activity. Current groups include: anger management, behavior modification, effective communication, accountability, respect, personal responsibility, domestic violence and cognitive interventions. Also, as mandated reporters, we comply with the mandates to promptly report to appropriate authorities anytime a threat of harm to another or self-harm is revealed. When Child Protective Services are involved with a mother, the team keeps the focus on child safety uppermost.
  9. Gender/Cultural/Age Responsive Treatment

    A diversity plan has been developed for each of the programs at ARC to build growth and improvements in this area with new research available. The goal is to implement the specific plans to create a culturally competent environment, programming, materials, education and activities. Consumers and staff participated in the development of the plan to assure gender, cultural and an age responsive treatment experience.

    Program components are continually evaluated and best practices and research literature continually explored to ensure incorporation of philosophy, procedures, practices and services representing “state-of-the-art” gender and culturally competent treatment. New services added allow for fuller development of elements identified as important to women-responsive treatment including trauma program and basic needs case management. The provision of culturally sensitive programs is a priority of ARC projects given that its target populations consists of those who have experienced oppression because of gender, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation and poverty or class. Further integration of trauma into AODA recovery and stabilization groups using training from the RICH Model will continue to be done.
  10. Self-Sufficiency

    ARC has strengthened the integrated service delivery model for each ARC woman and her family by linking AODA treatment with positive employment outcomes as well as the addressing of basic needs through case management especially housing and barrier issues such as co-occurring trauma issues which can destabilize participation in treatment/employment. All treatment planning and service delivery is designed to support women and their families in achieving self-sufficiency in all essential life domains. The philosophical emphasis of the case management model being utilized is to move a woman from dependence to empowerment and self-sufficiency. The addition of the housing case management component in the ARC’s programs will assist in addressing the number one barrier for women to recovery in Dane County – long-term, safe, permanent housing.
  11. Education and Work Focus

    ARC intends to more fully provide for employability and economic self-sufficiency for its clients. Coordination with Workforce Development allows for women who are in need of W-2T level of TANF to receive day treatment, childcare, case management and if needed, transitional housing. Continuing care services are also available in the evening. Program services currently assist clients in obtaining adequate childcare; transportation; clothing; housing and for any other services that would otherwise prevent them from staying gainfully employed. Service delivery assists women in obtaining self-resiliency/self-sufficiency, improving their quality of life and allowing them to make a productive contribution for self, family and the community which builds on strengths.
  12. Belief in Growth, Learning and Recovery

    ARC programming incorporates positive reinforcement, self-help and relational models, use of positive peer culture and stresses each woman’s participation in her treatment process. ARC is dedicated to the creation of safe space/environment that instills hope and treats women and their families with dignity and respect.

    The basic belief at ARC is that women care about their children and that change is possible. By allowing women to set their own goals the process of change is more effectively set into motion. Families want life to become better. The process of evaluating strengths and needs at ARC begins with asking women what they like about their life and what they would like to have different and how we can help. A plan is then developed based on the strengths that the woman has identified to address the needs she has. The job of this service is to provide information and resources to a woman and her supports/family that will take her where she wants to go if she chooses to use them.
  13. Outcome-Oriented

    Utilization of strength-based case management in the primary life domains and AODA treatment plan development by the key participants, especially the woman herself, as well as other relevant systems such as probation and parole, human services or public health to establish goals over the length of a woman’s participation which are monitored on a regular basis and revised as needed under the primary responsibility and coordination of the AODA Counselor and designated Case Manager. The goals are individualized for each woman and her family, and are quantifiable as much as possible, with a time frame for accomplishment identified.



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Paulette Romashko, Project Director
ARC Community Services, Inc.
2001 West Beltline Hwy, Suite 102
Madison, WI 53713
Phone: 608-278-2300
Fax: 608-278-2313
info@arccommserv.com






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